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Contents Foreword Introduction Standards Appendix Bibliography
Documenting the Cultural Heritage
Standards in Practice: Greenwich
  Core Data Index
  Core Data Standard
  Object ID
  Object ID Checklist
the standards
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Sample Record 2:
Core Data Standard for Archaeological Sites
and Monuments


Greenwich Park is a medieval deer park created in 1433. It subsequently became a royal park, associated with the Tudor palace of Placentia. The Park was redesigned in the 1660s as a formal landscape to accompany a proposed new royal palace following the Restoration of King Charles II. The site incorporates evidence of earlier settlement, including a Roman temple site and an Anglo-Saxon barrow cemetery. This record documents the medieval deer park of 1433, although it contains a cross reference to a record of the Anglo-Saxon Barrow cemetery (see 2.1.5.2).

2.1 Name and References 610514
2.1.1 Reference Number  
2.1.2 Name of Monument
or Site
Greenwich Park
2.1.3 Date of Compilation and Date of Last Update  
2.1.3.1 Date of Compilation 1998-01-25
2.1.3.2 Date of Last Update 1998-03-13
2.1.4 Originator of Reference Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England
2.1.5 Cross Reference to Related Records of Monuments or Sites  
2.1.5.1 Reference Number 404328; 610612
2.1.5.2 Qualifier of Relationship Contains Anglo-Saxon Barrows; Related to the Queen's House
2.1.5.3 Originator of Reference Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England
2.1.6 Cross Reference to Archaeological Collections and Artefacts  
2.1.7 Cross Reference to Documentation  
2.1.7.1 Reference Number 910061
2.1.7.2 Type of Documentation/Archive Unpublished Text, Graphic, Photographic
2.1.7.3 Originator of Reference Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England
2.1.8 Cross Reference to Archaeological Events  
2.1.8.1 Reference Number 1012515
2.1.8.2 Type of Event Survey
2.1.8.3 Start Date of Recording Event 1993-09
2.1.8.4 End Date of Recording Event 1994-02
2.1.8.5 Originator of Reference Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England
2.2 Location  
2.2.1 Administrative Location  
2.2.1.1 Country or Nation United Kingdom
2.2.1.2 Geo-political Unit England
2.2.1.3 Administrative Sub-division London Borough of Greenwich
2.2.2 Site Location  
2.2.2.1 Description of Location On the south bank of the River Thames, seven miles south-east of central London
2.2.3 Address  
2.2.3.1 Name for Address Purposes Greenwich Park
2.2.3.2 Number in the Street/Road  
2.2.3.3 Name of Street/Road  
2.2.3.4 Locality Greenwich
2.2.3.5 Town or City London
2.2.3.6 Postal Code SE10 8QY
2.2.4 Cadastral Reference/Land Unit  
2.2.5 Cartographic Reference  
2.2.5.1 Cartographic Identifier  
2.2.5.2 Spatial Referencing System Ordnance Survey
2.2.5.3 Topology P [point]
2.2.5.4 Qualifier Centre  
2.2.5.5 Sequence Number  
2.2.5.6 Z Coordinate  
2.2.5.7 X Coordinate 5390
2.2.5.8 Y Coordinate 1770
2.3 Type  
2.3.1 Monument or Site Type Deer Park
2.3.2 Monument or Site Category Gardens, Parks and
Urban Spaces
2.4 Dating  
2.4.1 Cultural Period  
2.4.1.1 Cultural Period Medieval
2.4.2 Century  
2.4.2.1 Century 15th century
2.4.3 Date Range  
2.4.3.1 From Date 1433
2.4.3.2 To Date 1540
2.4.4 Scientific and Absolute Dates  
2.4.4.1 Date  
2.4.4.2 Method  
2.5 Physical Condition Intact
2.5.1 Condition  
2.5.2 Date Condition Assessed 1994-02
2.6 Designation/Protection Status  

2.6.1 Type of Designation or Protection 2.6.2 Date of Designation or Protection
  1. Register of Parks and Gardens — Grade I   January 1988
  2. World Heritage Site   4th December 1997

2.6.3 Reference Number 2.6.4 Originator of Reference
  1.   English Heritage
  2.   UNESCO

2.7 Archaeological Summary
  Greenwich Park is a medieval deer park created by Duke Humphrey of Gloucester in 1433 to complement his residence on the south bank of the River Thames. It subsequently became a royal park, associated with the Tudor palace of Placentia. It incorporates evidence of earlier settlement, including a Roman temple site and an Anglo-Saxon barrow cemetery. The Park was redesigned in the 1660s as a formal landscape to the south of the Queen's House, to accompany a proposed new royal palace following the Restoration of King Charles II. It now has the character of an urban, public park.


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