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Documenting the Cultural Heritage
Standards in Practice: Greenwich
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Sample Record 1:
Core Data Index to Historic Buildings and Monuments of the Architectural Heritage

The Queen's House, Greenwich, was designed by Inigo Jones as a small private retreat for the Stuart Queens, Anne of Denmark and Henrietta Maria. Since the early nineteenth century the building has been in institutional use, first as part of the Royal Naval Asylum, amalgamated in 1821 with the Greenwich Hospital School, and now as the centrepiece of the National Maritime Museum. This sample record documents these three different uses: Domestic-House, Educational-School, Educational-Museum (see 3.0). Three principal construction phases are recorded: 1616-1619, 1629-1640 and 1661-1663 (see 4.0). Persons and organisations associated with the Queen's House are also recorded along with the roles they played in relation to the building, e.g.,: Inigo Jones (architect), Orazio Gentileschi (painter), Queen Anne of Denmark (patron), National Maritime Museum (occupier) and the dates at which these roles were played (see 5.0). The Queen's House forms part of the ensemble of the National Maritime Museum (1.5), and is linked to the archaeological record for Greenwich Park (1.8).

1.0 Names and References The Queen's House
1.1 Name of Building  
1.2 Reference Number 610612
1.3 Date of Compilation 6th March 1998
1.4 Recording Organisation Royal Commission on the Historical Monuments of England
1.5 Cross Reference to Ensembles etc. National Maritime Museum
1.6 Cross Reference to Fixtures and Movable Items [records of objects in National Maritime Museum]
1.7 Cross Reference to Documentation TQ 3877 26/G53 (DoE List Reference)
1.8 Cross Reference to Archaeology 610514 [record for Greenwich Park]
1.9 Cross Reference to Environment  
2.0 Location  
2.1 Administrative Location  
2.1.1 State United Kingdom
2.1.2 Geo-political Unit England
2.1.3 Sub-division London Borough of Greenwich
2.1.4 Sub-division  
2.2 Address  
2.2.1 Postal Name National Maritime Museum
2.2.2 Number  
2.2.3 Street/Road Romney Road
2.2.4 Locality Greenwich
2.2.5 Town/City London
2.2.6 Postal Code SE10 9NF
2.3 Cartographic Reference  
2.3.1 X Coordinate 5387
2.3.2 Y Coordinate 1777
2.3.3 Spatial Referencing System Ordnance Survey
2.4 Cadastral Reference/
Land Unit
 
3.0 Functional Type  

3.1 Type 3.1.1 Date 3.2 Category
  1. House   1616-1807   Domestic
  2. School   1807-1933   Educational
  3. Museum   1937-   Educational

4.0 Dating  
4.1 Period  
4.2 Century 17th century
4.3 Date Range  

4.3.1 From 4.3.2 To
  1. 1616   1619
  2. 1629   1640
  3. 1661   1663

4.4 Absolute Date
5.0 Persons & Organisations

5.1 Name 5.2 Role 5.2.1 Date
  1. Jones, Inigo   Architect   1616-40
  2. De Caus, Salomon   Garden Designer   1611-13
  3. Gentileschi, Orazio   Painter   1636-38
  4. Queen Anne of Denmark   Patron   1616-19
  5. Queen Henrietta Maria   Patron   1629-40
  6. Royal Naval Asylum/ Greenwich Hospital School   Occupier   1807-1933
  7. National Maritime Museum   Occupier   1937-

6.0 Building Materials/Techniques
6.1 Walls
Stone, Brick, Stucco
6.2 Roof
Leaded
7.0 Physical Condition
7.1 General Condition
Restored
Good
8.0 Protection/Legal Status

8.1 Type 8.2 Present Grade 8.3 Date Granted
  1. Listed Building   Grade I   8th June 1973
  2. Scheduled Ancient Monument     31st March 1994
  3. World Heritage Site     4th December 1997

9.0 Notes
9.1 Historical Summary
The Queen's House was designed by Inigo Jones as a small private retreat for the Stuart Queens, Anne of Denmark and Henrietta Maria. Spanning the road which separated the Royal Palace from the Park at Greenwich, it was built in three phases between 1616 and 1663. The first truly classical Renaissance building to be erected in England, the house was sumptuously decorated and some of the finest art treasures of the Stuart Court were displayed there prior to the Civil War. Since the early nineteenth century the building has been in institutional use, first as part of the Royal Naval Asylum, amalgamated in 1821 with the Greenwich Hospital School, and now as the centrepiece of the National Maritime Museum. Restorations during the 1930s and 1980s have attempted to restore the building to its seventeenth-century appearance.


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