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Activity Report 1998 - 2001
The General Secretariat
Membership Service


The Membership Sector aimed to carry out some of the core activities called for in the Triennial Programme adopted for the period 1998-2001, to wit:

Reform Task Force

For the Reform Task Force (RTF), the Membership Officer researched and drew up working documents on ICOM's governance (including its administrative procedures & practices) and its partners. Along with the Administrative Officer, she provided research support to the RTF members and attended its meetings.

Communication

In striving to improve communications with new and potential members, the Unit undertook a second revised edition of its Welcome Brochure. This publication cites all the advantages accruing to individual and institutional members. It describes the functions of the policy-making bodies of the Organisation and its component bodies. The Brochure gives brief descriptions of the work of International Committees and Affiliated Associations and informs members on how to apply to these bodies.

As part of its communications policy, it continued to circulate its Manual of Administrative Procedures (revised April 1999), accompanied by a leaflet entitled 'For More Information', to all newly-elected Chairs and Secretaries (and in some instances to Treasurers) of ICOM's component bodies.

It updated its Membership Kit, designed to assist museum professionals in any country to establish National Committees where none exist as yet. Each Kit contains the following: Statutes & Code of Professional Ethics, Model Internal Rules for National Committees, documents concerning the annual dues in each membership category, advantages of membership, modes of payment of annual dues (including UNESCO Coupons), subsidies, ICOM Fund, etc.

The Unit circulated information on the ICOM Fund to all the active National Committees of ICOM, encouraging them to contribute to the Fund and thereby aiding colleagues temporarily unable to pay annual membership fees. Using the medium of ICOM News, the Unit called upon other members to donate to the Fund.

Preferential Tarifs on Publications

During this period, the Unit successfully sought discounts/and or preferential rates for the following publications from UNESCO: World Heritage Review (a quarterly magazine available in English, French & Spanish) and its yearly Desk Diary.

It continued to collaborate closely with the UNESCO Publications Office in the distribution of MUSEUM International (English, French and Spanish editions) to ICOM's institutional members.

Relations with ICOM Committees

In October 1999, the Membership Officer (together with other staff members) met with the Chairperson and Board members of the German National Committee as well as the Chairs and representatives of National Committees of Eastern Europe (Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia).

At the invitation of the National Committee of Israel, the Membership Officer participated in a seminar organised by INTERCOM in Jerusalem (February 2000). The ICOM President and a Vice President also attended. This seminar on strategic planning and management was considered a success by the delegates who participated in the various workshops.

In May 2000, at the invitation of the French-speaking Association of Museums in Belgium, the Membership Officer attended the launching (in Namur, Belgium) of the publication entitled Le Vade-mecum du surveillant ou de l'agent du musée. Co-produced by the Belgian and Swiss National Committees, the manual was specifically written for museum guards, with an extra chapter devoted to receiving visitors.

Staff met with delegates of MPR and CIMUSET when these Committees had their annual meetings in Paris.

Evolution of Membership

The tables below show the evolution of paid-up membership during the triennial period 1998-2000.
(Note: figures are valid at 2 March 2001.)

N° OF PAID-UP MEMBERS BY CATEGORY AND YEAR
Individuals
1998
 
1999
 
2000
Difference (%)
Regular
11890
 
12198
 
12331
 
Associate
14
 
13
 
10
 
Contributor
6
 
6
 
6
 
Retired
1171
 
1154
 
1135
 
Supporting
28
 
23
 
27
 
TOTAL
13109
 
13394
 
13509
3,05

Institutions

           
Reg. A
287
 
308
 
324
 
Reg. B
211
 
229
 
228
 
Reg. C
472
 
459
 
452
 
Sustaining
6
 
6
 
6
 
Contributing
1
 
1
 
1
 
Supporting
1
 
1
 
1
 
TOTAL
978
 
1004
 
1012
3,48
           
TOTAL PAID-UP
14087
 
14398
 
14521
3,08

 

PAID-UP MEMBERSHIP BY REGION
1998
N° of Com,
1999
N° of Com,
2000
N° of Com, Difference %
Africa
456
31
419
28
378
29
-17,11
Asia/Pacific
1358
16
1129
17
977
16
-28,06
Europe
10178
41
10766
40
11245
41
10,48
Latin America/              
Caribbean
888
17
835
17
832
17
-6,31
North America
1207
2
1249
2
1089
2
-9,78
             
TOTAL
14087
107
14398
104
14521
105
3,08

 

National Committees

The following are the 10 National Committees that paid the largest number of annual dues to the Secretariat during the triennial period. (note: figures are valid at 2 March 2001.)

1998
Germany
1577
France
1376
U.S.A.
901
Switzerland
823
Netherlands
720
Denmark
624
Australia
559
Israel
543
Sweden
478
Spain
457
1999
 
Germany
1745
France
1449
U.S.A.
921
Switzerland
871
Netherlands
757
Denmark
668
Israel
531
Spain
502
Sweden
501
United Kingdom
490
2000
 
Germany
1896
France
1462
Switzerland
933
Netherlands
773
U.S.A.
748
Denmark
683
Israel
579
Spain
569
Sweden
539
United Kingdom
512

The above numbers could be explained by:

  • reduced membership activities in some regions (e.g. Africa, Arab States, Asia, North America),
  • programme activities organised in the regions did not automatically translate into more paid-up members,
  • priority given by the Unit to more effective collection of annual membership dues.

National Committees were established during the triennial period: Europe: Belarus, Bulgaria; Asia: Iran; Africa: Mauritius, Niger.

National Committees were re-organised during the period: Algeria, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Jordan, Mauritania, Senegal, South Africa, Tanzania, Zimbabwe.

National Committees were declared 'under reorganisation' during the period: Afghanistan, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Indonesia, Kyrgyztan, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Mongolia, Oman, Seychelles, Uzbekistan.

During this three-year period, a total of 4215 new members were registered, herewith broken down by year:

1998
1999
2000
1336
1219
1660

However, 4131 members were recorded as lapsed (mainly due to non-payment of annual subscriptions), herewith broken down by year:

1998
1999
2000
845
1203
2083

Financial Assistance Granted to National Committees

ICOM Fund

Established in 1991 by the Executive Council, the Fund continued to assist National Committees that experienced temporary financial difficulties.

The following National Committees benefited from the Fund during the period: Azerbaijan, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Central African Republic, Angola, Ukraine, Belarus, Dominican Republican, Togo.

Contributions were received from the following National Committees during the triennium: France (a yearly contributor since 1992), Switzerland (a yearly contributor since 1996), Burkina Faso (biggest contributor since the Fund's inception), Canada, Slovenia and two American individual members.

Membership Subsidies

The Organisation continues to grant regular individual membership subsidies to a list of countries (totalling 97) that have less than $ 2000 per capita income or are included in the U.N. list of Least Developed Countries. At this report's writing, 44 National Committees (out of 105) benefit from this kind of support (6.12% of the total active membership).

Special Membership Subsidies

Three National Committees were granted special subsidies by Council, thereby allowing their individual members to pay less than one-half of the fixed annual dues. These are: Botswana, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

International Committees

The Organisation counts 28 International Committees, three of which were established during this triennial period: DEMHIST (the International Committee for Historic House Museums), UMAC (the International Committee for University Museums and Collections), and ICOMAM (the International Committee for Museums of Arms and Military Collections). This last Committee converted itself from an international association affiliated with ICOM.

Two Committees changed their names: ICOMON, erstwhile Committee of Numismatics is now the International Committee for Money and Banking Museums; ICAA, the International Committee for Museums & Collections of Applied Art is henceforth known as the International Committee for Decorative Arts and Design with a new logo: ICDAD.

During the period, the Unit registered 2180 memberships to these International Committees (of which 392 lapsed). The active memberships are herewith broken down by year of enrolment:

1998
1999
2000
600
591
597

(Note: at this report's writing, only 6881 of the Organisation's active members are members of International Committees (i.e. less than half of the active membership).

Regular annual grants based on the number of voting members for each committee were granted each year: FF 38 for 1998, FF 39 for 1999 and FF 40 for 2000.

Affiliated Associations

The following two associations were granted affiliation status with the Organisation: PIMA, the Pacific Islands Museums Association and IACM, the International Association of Customs Museums. As noted in the above rubric for international committees, one affiliated association requested approval to become an international committee (ex-IAMAM).

ICOM presently counts 13 organisations officially affiliated with its work.

ICOM Foundation

The Unit manages the supporting memberships of the ICOM Foundation (39 active individuals at report's writing, a marked increase from 11 in 1998 and that is due mainly to the indefatigable energies of the Foundation's President). The Unit collects and processes the subscriptions of these members and in return assures that services are rendered to them (e.g. ICOM cards, publications, documents.)

Honorary Members

A member died during the period: Dr. M. Bacescu from Romania.

The Organisation presently counts nine (9) honorary members from the following countries: Brazil (Mr. M. Barata), Czech Republic (Mr. Jan Jelínek), France (M. Hubert Landais, Mme Marthe de Moltke), Israel (Mrs. Ayala Zacks-Abramov), Italy (Dr. Guglielmo de Angelis d'Ossat), Nigeria (Mr. Ekpo Eyo), Russia (Mrs. Irina Antonova), and the United Kingdom (Mr. Sayed Naqvi). The Unit assures that services are automatically rendered to them (e.g. cards, publications).

ICOM News (Subscriptions, Exchange & Complementary Lists)

The Membership Unit handles subscriptions to ICOM News (invoices, payments, distribution) from non-members (approx. 50). The Unit also assures complementary dissemination of the newsletter to a selective mailing list (comprising mainly of key UNESCO staff members, UNESCO National Commissions, Permanent Delegations to UNESCO, National Libraries and Documentation Centres). At report's writing, this list counted 420 names and addresses.

UNESCO

At the request of the President of the Advisory Committee and the Secretary General, the Membership Officer attended several sessions of the Administrative Commission of UNESCO's 30th General Conference (October-November 1999) as well as relevant meetings of the NGO Liaison Office and studied repercussions involved in a proposed rental of offices for NGOs presently headquartered within UNESCO's premises. Several memos were submitted to the Secretary General regarding this matter.

Administration

The Unit is composed of two permanent staff members. They are assisted in their tasks by two part-time clerks, one of whom is hired temporarily using " Solidarity " assistance sponsored by the government.

Following a change in UNESCO's policy, the Unit's membership data base was transferred from the UNESCO mainframe in December 1999 to personal computers. A consultant continues to train the Unit's personnel in the management of the data base, in selective extraction of data and their production on diskettes, attached files, lists and sticky labels.

At this report's writing, the Unit renders benefits and services to more than 15,500 active members from 140 countries; members who do not pay annual dues are recorded as lapsed and services (including publications) are suspended.



 
 
   
Updated: 17 June 2005